Showing posts with label Hapkido. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hapkido. Show all posts

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Introduction To HAPKIDO

Hapkido practitioner becomes well-versed in many kicks, punches, and blocks. From Aiki-Jujitsu (the predecessor of Aikido) it gets most of its grappling techniques. Hence, the Hapkido practitioner spends an equated volume of time learning techniques such as throws and joint locks. The advantage of studying Hapkido versus studying one striking style and one grappling style is that the practitioner learns to use the two approaches to flatter one another. For example, a Hapkido artist would use a punch to disrupt her training partner while a challenging throw is set up. 

Hapkido students practice throws and joint man...
Hapkido students practice throws and joint manipulation in a dojang.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

Conversely, a Hapkido performer can turn around or off-balance his opponent to decrease their knack to defend against a kick. Along these same lines, the Hapkido performer learns to counter in the opposite manner of an strike, hence mystifying the foe. As such, linear attacks are countered with a roundish technique and spherical attacks are countered with a linear technique. Hapkido artists furthermore become skilled at vital targets and pressure points in order to immobilise their attacker as fast as imaginable.

Hapkido - Very similar to traditional Hapkido, this contemporary version uses Muay Thai striking techniques as a replacement of getting its strikes.

Hapkido is a brand of self-defense that employs joint locks, pressure points, throws, kicks, and other strikes. Hapkido practitioners learn to counter the techniques of other martial arts as well as common "unskilled" attacks. There is also a range of traditional weapons including short stick, cane, rope, sword and staff which adjust in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined.

Albeit hapkido consist of both long and close range fighting techniques, the objective of most engagements is to get near for a close punch, lock, or throw. Hapkido emphasizes spherical motion, non-resisting movements, and ownership of the adversary. Practitioners seek to get advantage by the use of footwork and body positioning to employ leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.

On the "hard-soft" scale of martial arts, hapkido stands everyplace in the center, employing "soft" techniques similar to jujitsu and aikido as well as "hard" techniques reminiscent of taekwondo and tangsoodo. Even the "hard" techniques, though, emphasize spherical rather than linear movements. Hapkido is an eclectic martial art, and different hapkido schools emphasize varied techniques. Then again, some core techniques are found in each school (kwan), and all techniques should follow the three principles of hapkido:

Right Hapkido tactics include using footwork and a series of kicks and hand strikes to bridge the distance with an foe. Afterward to instantaneously control the balance of the rival (naturally by manipulating the head and neck), for a take down or to isolate a wrist or arm and apply a joint twisting throw, depending upon the situation; Hapkido is a comprehensive system and as the rival's balance has been taken, there are a myriad of techniques to disable and overcome the foe.

Hapkido endeavors to be a absolutely comprehensive fighting style and as such strives to keep away from narrow specialization in any particular variety of technique or range of fighting. It maintains a wide range of tactics for striking, standing jointlocks, throwing techniques (both pure and joint manipulating throws) and pinning techniques. some classes as well incorporate tactics for ground fighting notwithstanding these tactics readily tend to be focused upon escaping, controlling, striking and gouging tactics over submissions and emphasizing the capability to take one's feet and situational awareness over pins.

Like most martial arts, hapkido employs a great number of punches and hand strikes, as well as elbow strikes. A distinctive example of hapkido hand techniques is "live hand" punch that focuses energy to the baek hwa hyul in the hand, causing energy strikes and internal strikes. The hand strikes are readily used to weaken the training partner ahead of joint locking and throwing, and additionally as finishing techniques. Hand striking in hapkido (unless in competition) is not localized to punches and open hand striking; some significance is given to striking with talons at the throat and eyes; pulling at the foe's genitals is also covered in established training. in order to recall hand strikes more easily in an emotionally charged situation, beginning students are taught usual, effective routines of blocks and counterattacks called Makko Chigi, which results to more compound techniques as the student becomes familiar with them.

A good deal of of hapkido's joint control techniques are cited to be derived largely From aikijujutsu. They are taught additionally to aikido techniques, but in general the circles are lesser and the techniques are applied in a more linear fashion. Hapkido's joint manipulation techniques attack both large joints (such as the elbow, shoulder, neck, back, knee, and hip) and small joints (such as wrists, fingers, ankles, toes, jaw)

Wristlocks Hapkido is well accepted for its use of a wide variety of wristlocks. These techniques are believed to have been derived From Daito-ryu aikijujutsu even though their manner of performance is not always alike to that of the parent art. Still many of the tactics found in hapkido are quite similar to those of Daito-ryu and of aikido which was derived From that art. These involve such tactics as the supinating wristlock, pronating wristlock, internal rotational wristlock and the utilizing of pressure points on the wrist and are ordinary to many types of Japanese jujutsu, Chinese qin na and even 'catch as catch can' brawling.



Elbowlocks Even if well recognized for its wristlocking techniques hapkido has an equally wide range of tactics which centre upon the manipulation of the elbow joint (see armlocks). The first self defense technique typically taught in many hapkido schools is the knifehand elbow press. This technique is thought to be derived From Daito-ryu's ippondori, a development of disarming and destroying the elbow joint of a sword wielding foe. Hapkido classically introduces this technique off a wrist grabbing strike where the defender makes a roundish movement with his hands to free themselves From their foe's grasp and applies a pronating wristlock while cutting down upon the elbow joint with their forearm, taking their rival down to the ground where an elbow lock is administered with one's hand or knee to immobolize the attacker in a pin. Interestingly both Daito-ryu and aikido opt for to use handpressure on the elbow during the technique rather than using the forearm as a 'hand blade', cutting the into elbow joint, in the hapkido manner.

Hapkido training can be realized in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Hapkido to find a school near you!




Tuesday, November 29, 2016

The Art Of HAPKIDO

The martial art known as Hapkido is an art of complete self defense.  Those who study it are more than capable of defending themselves in any type of situation, being more than able to apply their confidence and discipline from the art to enhance their lives, protecting themselves and those that they love as well.

Hapkido holds many throwing techniques in comm...
Hapkido holds many throwing techniques in common with judo.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Hapkido teaches students to use minimal force with any stronger opponent.  Contrary to other martial arts, it doesn’t involve strength to execute the techniques.  To control the opponent and take him down, Hapkido focuses on pressure points and the impact they have on opponents.  It also involves a very powerful arsenal of thrusts, spin kicks, and sweeps.  If they are executed properly, the moves from this martial art can be very effective against opponents and attackers.

Along with kicks, punches, and pressure point attacks; Hapkido also uses wrist and joint manipulation locks, along with several throwing techniques.  All together, there are nearly 300 categories of special movements in Hapkido that involve nearly 3,500 techniques.

Hapkido is a very popular martial art, which is mainly due to the fact that just about anyone, regardless of age or weight can practice the techniques.  The martial art also involves systematic training and stamina exercise, which can improve your health.  You don’t need to be in the best shape either, as Hapkido can actually help your body as well as your health.

Studying Hapkido will also help with developing your muscles, along with your posture, controlling your weight, developing confidence, self control, even fulfilling your spirit.  Although it is mainly based in self defense techniques, it also teaches you how to become a better person and get yourself back in health and in touch with your spirit.

Throughout the style, the linear techniques work together to form a solid base in which all of the circular techniques can be perfected.  Everything in Hapkido is tried and tested, in order to come up with a balanced blend of techniques and skills that are apt for any situation.  With Hapkido being a martial art of self defense, there is a lot of practice involved blocking attacks in many different situations.  This way, the stylist can be more prepared for any situation he finds himself in.



Today, Hapkido is practiced by men and women of all ages, even little children.  It is a very beneficial martial art, one that can be utilized from nearly any position or direction, such as lying, sitting, and standing.  It is an art of self defense, and can even be deadly if the stylist is proficient with the techniques.  What makes it even more deadly though - is the fact that a lot of people aren’t familiar with it.