Showing posts with label Martial Arts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Martial Arts. Show all posts

Monday, October 23, 2017

Fundamentals of AIKIDO

Aikido Impact
Aikido - Photo   by     HoangP
Aikido is martial arts that resulted from the combination of several disciplines. It was created by Ueshiba sometime in the 1940s. It was the result of Ueshiba’s search for a technique that provided him with contentment not only in the technical sense but also in the spiritual end. 

Aikido comes from the three Japanese words, ai-ki-do, which means joining, spirit, and way respectively. In essence, aikido is a martial arts form that focuses on the joining of the spirit and the body and the mind to find the Way. 

Aikido has many techniques and moves. Its basic structure comes from the throws and locks found in jujitsu and also from the movements that experts do when they are fighting with swords and spears.

Fundamental Techniques of aikido 
Let’s look at the different fundamental movements of this martial arts. 
Ikkyo
This is the first technique in aikido, where control is achieved by the use of the hand on the elbow and one near the wrist. This is the grip that is also that can apply pressure into the ulnar, which can be found in the medial portion of the arm. 

Nikyo 
This is the second of the techniques, which is characterized by an adductive wristlock that twists the arm and then applies pressure in the nerve that can be really painful. 

Sankyo 
This is the third technique that incorporates a pronating move. It directs an upward tension all through the arm, the elbow, and the shoulder. 

Yonkyo 
The fourth installment in the fundamental movements of aikido, yonkyo uses a shoulder control movement similar to a ikkyo but this time there is no gripping of the forearm. Instead, the knuckles apply pressure on the radial nerve  

Gokyo 
The fifth technique is actually a variant of ikkyo. This time the hand gripping the wrist is inverted and twisted. 

Aikido protective moves
Here are some of the moves that you can use in order to disarm your opponent. 

Kotogaeshi – this is what is called in the English as the wrist return. In this move, the practitioner will place a wristlock and throw that will stretch up to the extensor digitorum 

Iriminage – called the entering-body throw, here the practitioner or the nage will move into space where the uke or the opponent is. This classic move resembles the clothesline technique. 

Kokyunage – this is the breath throw, a term that refers to the various types of “timing throws.”

Koshinage – this move is aikido’s version of the hip throw wherein the person will drop his hips a little lower than the opponent or the uke.  He will then flip the opponent with a resultant fulcrum.



Tenchinage – Called the heaven and earth throw because of the levels that the hands will reach. The uke or the practitioner will grab both wrists and then moves forward grabbing the hand low and the other high. This unbalances the uke, which will cause him or her to topple over. 

Shihonage- this is the four-direction throw, wherein the hand is folded back past the shoulders  and then afterward locking the joints in the shoulder  

Kaitennage- called the rotation throw, in kaitennage, the practitioner or the nage will move the arm backward until the shoulder joints are locked. He will then use this position to add pressure. 

Jujinage- this is the throw that is characterized by a throw that locks the arms together. This is called shape like a 10 throw because of its cross-shape, which looks like 10 in kanji.




Saturday, October 21, 2017

TAI CHI: An Overview

Yang style Tai Ji demo at Culture Fest in Chat...
Yang style Tai Ji demo at Culture Fest in Chattanooga.
 (Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
If you translate Tai Chi (Taiji), it would mean “Supreme Ultimate Force”. It is somewhat a state of infinite and absolute potentiality. It tackles on the concept of yin and yang or the Two Aspects governing the Four Realms and Five Elements.

Using those very important aspects, the world is created. Tai Chi also means “unity, one, or being able to attain oneness.”With the use of the concept of the positive and negative energy, Tai Chi is a form of force that can be assumed as a dual dynamic state in which force coming from within the body is used in means of achieving the supreme and ultimate discipline in oneself.Today, Tai Chi is practiced in many parts of the world including the Western World. It can be a sort of moving meditation and yoga combined. Tai Chi has its many forms or sets that consist of a number of sequential movements that was derived from martial arts that can be in the form of imitating the movements of different kinds of birds and animals in the most gentle and invigorating way. 

Even if it is a kind of movement involving martial arts, Tai Chi is done in a soft and graceful manner entailing smooth transitions in between.Practitioners see Tai Chi as a form of meditative interaction between the mind, body, soul and the environment. They don’t see it as a martial art technique but as an exercise to calm the body. Some consider Tai Chi as a combat interest because of its considerable force. With regards to Chinese medicine and philosophy, the existence of “chi” is important to the vitality that enables to animate the body. One of the many aims of Tai Chi is to promote circulation of the “chi” throughout the body. By promoting this belief, the vitality and health of a person are normally enhanced. Once the “chi” circulates around the body, it goes to the pattern of the vascular and nervous system and any organ correlated to it. Thus, making Tai Chi connected with the principles of oriental healing and acupuncture.


One of the most familiar aims of Tai Chi is fostering the calmness and tranquility of the mind. One’s mind must be focused on executing the exercise precisely because doing it in a proper manner provides an avenue to learn things about balance, motor control, alignment, movement rhythm, and the list goes on. If the person practicing Tai Chi can practice it every day, then he or she will reach to the extent of being able to stand, run, move, and walk in a better position. It also touches some of the spheres in a person’s life as well.There are numerous benefits seen by practitioners regarding Tai Chi. One of which is inhibiting the correct posture and alignment of the body which lessens further injuries and tension. 

Push-hands is a kind of Tai Chi that involves two persons. Here, principles regarding Tai Chi are applied in a manner that the response of the other person is developed in a more sensitive way. It is an opportunity to exhibit martial arts aspects in a kind of a slow-motion combat, without hurting the opponent. An emphasis that Tai Chi has channeled through its practitioners is that they can give out an energy that may be in a form of a destructive behavior or context without dissipating that energy in a harmful way.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

WING CHUN - Chinese Martial Art

Wing Chun performer #2
Wing Chun performer - Photo   by    matthewwu88  (cc)
Brief History:
Wing Chun (also known as Wing Tsun, Ving Chun or Ving Tsun) is one of the most popular types of Chinese martial arts. Though it’s basically an unarmed combat technique, Wing Chun may include weapons as part of its course. The origin of Wing Chun can be traced back to China, but the real history of its creation has long been a topic of much debate. The most credible suggestion regarding the origin of Wing Chun dates back to 1700 AD in the Henan Shaolin Monastery.

When the Qing forces raided and ravaged the Southern Shaolin temple, a nun named Ng Mui fled to the distant Daliang Mountains, the only survivor. Ng Mui already had knowledge of Kung Fu in the Shaolin temple, which she assimilated with a new form she had learned while observing a battle between a snake and a crane. She taught this new combat style to her adopted daughter whom she named Yimm Wing Chun. The new system was refined and then passed on from generation to generation, and was eventually named Wing Chun, after Yimm.

The modernization of Wing Chun started in Hong Kong during the 1950s under a Grandmaster called Yip Man. The discipline began to gain real popularity in Asia and the West when actor Bruce Lee became one of the most famous Wing Chun practitioners.

The Concept of Wing Chun:
Wing Chun is based on three basic principles - Practicality, Efficiency, and Economy of Movement.

1. Practicality: Techniques such as Palm-up Hand (tan sau), Wing Arm (bong sau), Slapping Hand (pak sau) are designed to maim the most sensitive or vulnerable parts of the opponent’s body such as throat, groin, eyes and lower torso. Many movements and techniques in Wing Chun are often meant to be fatal.

2. Efficiency: Wing Chun does not use force against force, in order to gain the most efficient manipulation of the body's energy. It believes in accurately timed and appropriately positioned little movements, and counter-attack is based on the opponent’s own force. This concept is also called Contact Reflexes.



3. The economy of Movement: This is a linear concept in which movements are based on an imaginary pole running vertically through the center of the body. The Center Line spreads out from this Mother Line, and since most of the vital points of the body are located along the Center Line, many offensive and defensive movements are based on this line. The Central Line, on the other hand, is the shortest path between the fighters where most of the combat exchanges take place.

Wing Chun Forms:
There are three basic forms in Wing Chun:

1. Empty Hand Form: This form has three more sub-forms - Siu Nim Tao - the foundation of the art, Chum Kiu - focus on advanced footwork and entry techniques, and Biu Jee - extreme short-range or long-range techniques, low kicks and sweeps, and emergency techniques.

2. Weapon Forms: The Dragon Pole and Butterfly Swords are the two forms of weapons incorporated in Wing Chun, categorized under advanced training.

3. Wooden Dummy or the Muk Yan Jong Form: A dummy made from several wooden posts represents a human opponent. The contraption is used to perfect angle, position, and footwork.




Tuesday, September 5, 2017

The Bo and other Long Wooden Staff MARTIAL ARTS WEAPONS

Besides rocks, one of the most basic of all weapons throughout mankind’s history across most cultures has been the long wooden stick. This makes sense since sticks were always readily available in the forests or could be easily made. The Asian martial arts took the long wooden staff into an art form as many martial art styles include the long staff in their systems. Some styles even have traditional weapons forms or katas featuring the long staff. Some systems of martial arts training with weapons such as the staff through practical techniques only without the use of set forms.

J.K. Lee Black Belt Academy
The Bo - Photo  by   scottfeldstein  (CC)
Unlike many martial art weapons such as swords, knives, kamas and says which are short range, staffs are long range weapons with superior reach. This enables the user to attack and defend from a distance which can be frustrating from the point of view of an opponent who has a short range weapon. Long range weapons are also useful in keeping multiple opponents out of reach too. Of course, long weapons such as the staff cannot be easily concealed like short range weapons so they can be cumbersome to carry around.

One of the most popular martial arts weapons from the Japanese karate styles is the bo. Even today, the bo is usually the first weapon taught at karate schools and is the most common weapon seen at tournaments. The bo staff comes in different variations. There are heavy bo staffs which resemble thick poles which are considered more traditional and there are lighter versions which are tapered at both ends. There are also multi-sided bo staffs such as octagonal but these are much less common than the usual round, circular versions.

Although there is one handed swing, most bo techniques involve both hands holding the weapon. Various strikes and blocks can be performed with either end of the bo as well as the sides and middle. Bo users take advantage of the entire weapon as techniques can be executed with any part of the bo. For the majority of techniques involving the bo, the user holds the staff near the middle with both ends protruding out equally. Traditionally, the lead hand (furthest away from the body) has been the right hand.

Contemporary weapons forms competitions have caused the bo to evolve where competitors now use extremely lightweight bo’s and some even have reflective finishes giving a more flashy visual appearance when the user is performing a bo form. Unlike traditional bo forms, contemporary creative open forms with the bo involve more complex spins and even tosses. Some martial artists do not consider some of the modern bo forms observed in the competition circuits to be true weapons forms as some competitors emphasize too much baton-like twirling action rather than actual combative techniques. It could very well be a matter of personal taste. This is why in most of the large open martial arts tournaments, weapons divisions are split into traditional and creative.

Chinese kung fu styles also utilize the long staff although there are some differences in techniques when compared to Japanese karate styles. Instead of holding the weapon in the middle most of the time like a bo is held, Chinese staffs are usually held near one end which has the effect of elongating the weapon even more. Traditionally, the lead hand is the left hand with the right holding the bottom end of the staff. However, there are techniques which involve switching sides as well as using the bottom end to strike too. In addition to strikes executed while holding the weapon with both hands, there are more single handed techniques with Chinese staffs than with Japanese bo staffs. Like their empty hand kung fu forms, Chinese staff forms have more circular, swinging techniques than in Japanese karate styles.


Contemporary wushu forms use a much lighter weapon than in traditional kung fu staff forms. Wushu stylists also use staffs or cudgels that are made of a unique white wax wood from trees that are grown only in China. Staffs made of this type of wood are not made with precision like Japanese bo’s. The wushu staffs are naturally tapered with a thicker bottom and thinner top. The white wax wood is extremely resilient as users of this type of Chinese staff perform techniques which involve smashing the entire weapon on the floor at full force.

Korean kuk sul won also has the long staff in their system and the techniques used are a blend of Chinese and Japanese moves. Although all martial arts styles that utilize weaponry have more complex and possibly more impressive looking weapons, the long staff has remained to be a favourite for many martial artists.


Thursday, August 17, 2017

Using AIKIDO Moves in Practice or in Combat

It only takes a split second whether someone comes out as a victor or a loser in combat. The person can try to remember it, later on, to see what errors were made in order to become a better fighter in the future.

Photo: Wikimedia


Such things also happen in a competition which is why it is best for the student to be familiar with the various Aikido moves at all times.

For instance, in Ai hanmi Iriminage a person grabs the attacker by the neck and forces the opponent to the ground. 

In Ai hanmi Kokyuho, this is similar to the first with the difference of extending the arm a little farther in order to achieve maximum effect.


Should the attacker have a knife, a good aikido move to use is called Katate Ryotemochi in which the individual uses both hands to block the weapon used by the attacker and disarming it before putting the person on the ground.

If the individual is able to get behind the attacker, perhaps doing Ushiro Ryokatatori will be a good idea. This will allow the student to grab both shoulders of the person. Should the individual be tough, perhaps applying Ushiro Kubishime, which will temporarily cut the air supply until the assailant is unconscious, is the best thing to do?


Not all the aikido moves being taught are just to block and the make the person fall to the ground. There are also striking moves such as Kata Menuchi in which the hand makes a slice to the middle of the forehead. Those who don’t want to inflict a concussion can try Mune Tsuki, which is a strike to the chest.

A good move for the leg is the Aiki Otoshi better known in English as a leg sweep. This will surely keep the person down especially when that attacker thinks that all the student can do is use the arms when defending.

Once the attacker has been subdued, it will be safer to keep the attacker locked in a Sankyo hold. This technique is used by police, which is very useful when the police are on the way to the location.  

There are more than 10 different moves in Aikido. The person should be able to distinguish one from the other especially when the terms are all in Japanese. It will be the choice of the individual which one to use when one is engaged in combat.

The first step in learning this martial art will be to enroll in a dojo. The person can look at the directory to find the nearest one to the home and then choose to sign up if the rates are affordable. 

The student will then be taught the rules, how to wear the uniform and then the proper moves in each stroke. The individual should not expect to get it right on the first day but eventually do better in the coming days. 

The person should remember that Aikido, unlike other martial arts, can only be used for defensive purposes. Usually, when the suspect has failed in the attack, this person will run so the individual should not give chase but rather get help.

It is only with practice sparring with a partner or even doing the same thing in a competition that both the mind and the body can be conditioned to engage an attacker in combat. 


Friday, August 11, 2017

KUNG FU: History And Basic Principles

Shaolin kung fu
Shaolin kung fu (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The Term:
Historically, the term “Kung Fu” is not really featured in any ancient texts. It was first coined by a Frenchman named Jean Joseph Marie Amiot, a missionary who lived in the 18th Century, in reference to Chinese martial arts. Kung Fu is also called Gongfu, Wushu, or Kuoshu, and originally denotes expertise in any skill, and not exclusive to martial arts.

Brief History:
The practice, philosophy, and concept of Kung Fu can be traced back to ancient Chinese texts such as Zhuang Zi, Dao De Jing, and Sun Zi Bing Fa (Art of War written by Sun Zi), all written between 1111-255 BC. These texts contain passages related to the practice, propagation, and principles of Chinese martial arts, or Kung Fu as it is known today.

One theory regarding the first written history of Kung Fu suggests that the Yellow Emperor, who reigned from 2698 BC, wrote the first treatise on Chinese martial arts. Others give credit to Taoist monks for introducing an art form that resembles modern Tai Chi around 500 BC. Then in 39-92 AD, Pan Ku included "Six Chapters of Hand Fighting" in his discourse on the history of the Han dynasty (Han Shu). As the popularity of martial arts progressed, a physician named Hua Tuo also wrote his own treatise entitled, “Five Animals Play" in 220 AD.

Kung Fu had become a common word in the West beginning in the late 1960s, popularized by martial arts movies and TV series. The Western world today has also seen an immense upsurge in the creation and production of martial arts movies starring great actors/masters such as Jackie Chan and Jet Li.





Basic Principles:
The concept of Kung Fu revolves around three basic principles – Motivation, Self-discipline and Time.

According to experts, the real motivation behind learning Kung Fu is an inspiration and not force, which should come from an inner craving to learn and develop the mind and body. The motivation here is the fundamental driving force. There is no external or worldly gain for the learner, and the only reward is that of knowledge, skill, strength, and wisdom.

In Kung Fu, discipline is complementary to motivation. Discipline puts motivation into deed and action. A learner has to make an effort into what he has been motivated for, and self-discipline helps him get started and guides him to achieve that goal. Therefore, without discipline, motivation is just a dormant state of mind.

Time is the path to perfection in martial arts. Once motivation and self-discipline have set in, a learner has to spend a considerable amount of time putting mind and body into practice. A truly inspired learner does not have the privilege to waste time, stay idle or indulge in fruitless activities. Everything done by him/her should reflect real motivation and self-discipline.

Variants and Styles:
With the passage of time, numerous variants and styles have come up in martial arts, or Kung Fu. Some of the more popular ones include Karate, Escrima, Wing Chun, Jujitsu, Judo, Tae Kwon Do, Shaolin, White Crane, T'ai Chi Ch'uan, and Bagua Zhang.




Saturday, August 5, 2017

Methods Of QIGONG In KUNG FU Training

Qigong is a general name for the systems of hardening and improvement of body and mind, treatment and health enhancement created in China. They primarily based on the ability to control your own consciousness, mentality and through them all the physiological processes of the organism. Practicing Qigong you can achieve stunning results some of which even the powerful modern science cannot conceive and explain.

There are three main categories of Qigong: Health-improving, Fighting and Mystical.

1. It was Chinese physicians who developed and evolved the Health-improving Qigong during many centuries. They created special exercises aimed to preserve and promote health as well as to cure various diseases.

2. Fighting (or Hard) Qigong was developed by those practitioners of Qigong who at the same time were masters of martial arts. These exercises serve to enhance the energy concentration in muscles and other parts of the body allowing to hugely increase the bodily strength and its resistance against the attempts to cause it a physical injury.

3. Mystical Qigong is a child of Buddhist monks and Taosian anchorites. The goal of Mystical Qigong consists in achieving the so called Enlightenment – a special psychophysical state of the human being. Taosian anchorites also developed methods of anti-aging based on Mystical Qigong. Mystical Qigong is the most difficult to master.

qi-gong_brocart-6
Qigong - Photo by No-Stress 
Qigong is not only the art of Qi energy control; it trains the mind and helps to work out the ability to control your volitional impulse. Qigong techniques include a huge variety of exercises but they all consist of the three main parts: control of position, control of breath, and control of mind.

Controlling his position, a man can acquire some optimal posture of body which would allow Qi to flow in the organism without delays or blockages not causing any disturbing feelings and removing diseases. The exercises are mostly performed in common stands, for example, in the Rider’s stance.

You need to control your breath to let the external Qi (from the air) not only to pass mechanically into the internal state but to spread along energy channels, fully feeding all the organs.

Consciousness is crucial in breath control; it distributes Qi along the body. At the highest stage, the breath is controlled at the level of subconsciousness and do not require too much of your attention.

Step by step learning to control his energy resources, a practitioner will pass from using the physical strength (Li) to the internal burst of effort (Tsin). This internal effort, as Chinese masters believe, is produced not by muscles but in tendons and marrow.

This is the reason why the most of Kung Fu exercises aimed not to increase the mass of muscles but to strengthen tendons and bones. While muscles tend to loose their strength (Li) as the man grows older, masters preserve their internal effort (Tsin) until great age. That’s why Chinese masters of Kung Fu say: “If you do not practice Fighting Qigong but train only your physical strength you’ll be left with nothing when you grow old enough.”

Qigong exercises advance “internal Qi” our organism contains. “Internal Qi” is also called “true Qi”. The state of “true Qi” depends on many factors: regular Fighting Qigong exercises, nutrition, mental state, environment, etc. Every human being has internal Qi but only few can use it properly, develop it. The Qi of the vast majority of people is destabilized. The goal of Fighting Qigong is to fill the organism with “true Qi”, calm it, make Qi flow along channels freely without obstructions.

So what is Qi after all? According to Chinese notions, it is an energetic substance which represents the foundation of all, i. e. the energetic foundation of the Universe. Our body can be compared to an electric appliance: if it is supplied with electric power it works but if the power supply is cut down the device operation stops. Likewise with the man: if Qi supply of his body is insufficient or it gets stagnant in it, the man gets sick or even dies.

To have a healthy robust body, one needs to learn how to keep the Qi circulation smooth and to be able to accumulate sufficient amount of Qi. To do so, it is necessary to understand the system of circulation and storage of Qi in your organism.

The human body has twelve so called primary channels (meridians) along which Qi is spread across the entire organism. There also exist eight “miraculous” vessels serving as a kind of reservoirs storing and regulating Qi. One end of each channel is attached to one of twelve internal organs while the other end is connected to one of fingers or toes.


These twelve channels supply with Qi energy twelve internal organs. Besides, these channels also take the excessive energy away from internal organs allowing us to through it out of the body. When due to blockage or disease the circulation of Qi along the channels is interrupted, one or several organs cannot get enough Qi which leads to their functional disturbance.

To be healthy, you need to learn how to keep the circulation of Qi in the twelve channels smooth and constantly replenish the “miraculous vessels” with energy.

If you understand the theory of Qi circulation in the human body you will be able to understand how Qi relates to martial arts as well. Remember, your body is not simply a machine it is an organism able to improve itself. The stronger Qi is, the stronger the human body gets.

Fighting Qigong practice sessions serve to enhance the capabilities of your body. We know that using our mind we can control various parts of our own body. The process of control is simple. Our mind generates a thought, and the thought leads Qi to the corresponding parts of the body which perform the requested action. The key thing about Fighting Qigong is in learning to lead your Qi as efficient as it can be. In this case you can increase you strength very much.

Chinese martial arts masters learn to focus their minds through meditation or other kinds of training practice to make Qi obey them easily. This can substantially enhance the strength of a fighter and increase the efficiency of his technique.




Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The Martialarm Introduction To CAPOEIRA

Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art, game, and culture created by enslaved Africans in Brazil during the 17th Century. Participants form a roda (circle) and take turns playing instruments, singing, and sparring in pairs in the center of the circle. The game is marked by fluid acrobatic play, feints, subterfuge, and extensive use of groundwork, as well as sweeps, kicks, and headbutts. Throughout the game, a player must avoid a sweep, trip, kick, or head butt that may knock him or her on the floor. Less frequently-used techniques include elbow-strikes, slaps, punches, and body-throws. Capoeira has three variations known as "Capoeira Angola", "Capoeira Regional", and the ever-evolving "Capoeira Contemporânea".

Capoeira - Photo: Wikimedia
From the 16th to the 19th centuries, Portugal shipped slaves into South America from western Africa. The South American country of Brazil was the most common destination for African captives[citation needed] with 42% of all enslaved peoples shipped across the Atlantic. Most commonly sold into Brazil were Akan, Igbo, Yoruba, Dahomean, Muslim Guineans, Hausa, and Bantu (among them Kongos, Kimbundas and Kasanjes) from Angola, Congo and Mozambique.

These Africans brought their cultural traditions and religions with them to the New World. One theory suggests that capoeira originated from a fern courtship dance[citation needed] in Angola used by suitors of young women, however, this is only one of many disputed theories. There is contention as to whether the game arrived with enslaved Africans or whether Africans refined a preexisting Brazilian game. One catalyst for capoeira was the homogenization of African people under the oppression of slavery. Capoeira emerged as a way to resist oppression, secretly practice art, transmit culture, and lift spirits. Some historians believe that the indigenous peoples of Brazil also played an important role in the development of capoeira.


Capoeira was advanced by Brazilian slaves of African descent (presumably admitted from the Portuguese colony of Angola) some time in the 16th century. since it was illegal for slaves to practice fighting skills, they varied native African spiritual dances so that each time they practised their art they might appear to merely be dancing. Due to the fact these dances included manoeuvres such as handstands, back flips, and cartwheels, Capoeira is today the most energetic of all martial arts, with many kicks being executed from a handstand position. Its offensive techniques are initially kicks, its defensive techniques are in the beginning body movements which stay away from the enemy's attack all together. African culture is a large part of studying Capoeira, above all since training and competition is done to the rhythm of the berimbau, a single- stringed musical instrument. Only in the 20th century has the practice of Capoeira become legal in Brazil, and Only in very modern years has it been taught in other countries.

In 1942, Mestre Pastinha opened the first formal academy for instruction in the traditional form of the art, known as capoeira Angola. Mestre Pastinha's efforts prevented capoeira Angola from being lost as newer, modernized forms of the art gained popularity.

This era was a milestone of a dramatic change in the mode of instruction of the art of capoeira. Previously, capoeira was passed on in secret, usually from a relative such as one's father or uncle, or in a small group setting where several young people in a particular community would receive guidance from elder practitioners from that community. During this era, the academy system became the predominant form of participation in the art. Presently, there are capoeira academies on almost every continent of the world.



Another significant change that occurred due to the proliferation of capoeira 'schools' is the participation of middle and upper class members of the population. Presently, some Mestres participate in seminars where they discuss the need to make the art available to poor blacks who can not afford the cost of training in an academy. This is an issue of concern to practitioners who recognize the importance of making the art available to people who come from the culture that invented the art in the first place.

Capoeira training can be done in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Capoeira to find a school near you!



Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The 5 Animals Of KUNG FU

Also known as the Kung Fu fist forms, the 5 animals of Kung Fu are known all across the world, and are some of the deadliest martial arts you can study.  There are other specific fist styles in Kung Fu, although none of them are as powerful or as well known as the 5 animal styles.  As the name implies, these forms were derived from the animals in which they got their names from.

Students of Shaolin Kung Fu school perform ren...
Students of Shaolin Kung Fu school perform renowned shaolin kungfu (martial art). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



The Dragon Claw

The Dragon Claw is very well known, with the Chinese believing that this style comes directly from the ancient dragon.  This style uses an open hand technique that is used for controlling the opponent through grabbing and throwing.  Using an open hand technique, stylists may also use the fingers to poke as well.  Dragon Claw is very fast, very hard to defend against - and nearly impossible to predict.

The Leopard Claw
The Leopard Claw style utilizes a half opened fist.  The ideal striking method with Leopard is the ridge of the hand, which is formed by folding the fingers towards the palm of the hand, with the palm being the backup or secondary striking method.  Leopard Claw is very fast as well, and very lethal if the stylist has enough technique and power behind his strikes.

The Tiger Claw
Tiger Claw uses an open hand movement that is used for tearing and grabbing.  Tiger Claw is the most well known of the 5 animal system, and also one of the most well known forms of Kung Fu as well.  It isn’t affected by simply grabbing and gripping with the hand, but from the digging of the fingernails deep into the skin.  Once the fingernails have been embedded in the opponent’s skin, the Tiger Claw stylist can shred the skin right off the bone, tearing the opponent apart.  Tiger Claw is very powerful - and one of the deadliest forms in the world of martial arts.

The Snake Head
Snake Head resembles the attack of a snake in combat, using an open hand technique which requires the fingers to be held together tight, fully extended.  The tips of the finger form a very hard surface, used to attack the softest and most vital areas of the opponent.  In order to be effective, both hands need to be used together at the same time.

The Crane Beak
Crane involves the fingers being pressed together tightly, forming a striking surface at the base of the stylist’s fingertips.  Although the fingers can be conditioned to a high level of strength, most attacks using the Crane technique are focused towards the most vital areas of an opponent.

The 5 animal styles of Kung Fu are very popular, and very deadly.  Martial artists that know any of these forms are very deadly - and more than capable of defending themselves against anything that comes their way.


Thursday, July 20, 2017

10 Common-sense SELF DEFENSE Tips For Men

For more than 30 years I have been running specialized self defence courses and seminars. Over that time I have shown thousands of people how to protect and look after themselves.

Increasing personal safety ALWAYS commences with awareness.

Since most men may be attacked in almost any situation and for a wide-ranging variety of reasons I offer the following advice.


Here is a list of ten simple things that you can do immediately that will increase your safety:

1 - Most men get involved in physical trouble as a result of saying something rude, offensive, tactless, stupid or hurtful. Controlling what comes out of your mouth can keep it in good shape. Think before you speak.

2 - If a fight breaks out in a bar - leave immediately. Go before all the drunks and brawlers start swinging chairs, bottles, glasses and punches. A "free for all" usually starts with just two protagonists. Innocent bystanders often get hit. Those who leave all the fools to bash each other do not.

3 - NEVER attempt to mediate an argument between a man and a woman. Both will cease arguing or fighting with each other and turn on you - the common enemy. If you fear for the woman's safety, call the police.

4 - Understand that many people these days have a cocktail of drugs and booze in their veins. It makes them argumentative, aggressive and "Mike Tyson-esque." Avoid people who are "off the planet." Even a casual glance at them can set them off. Leave them with their own demons.

5 - Don't make the fatal mistake of thinking that ANYBODY fights "fair" any more. Those days are over - they have been since the John Wayne era! Expect multiple attackers, weapons, possibly both.

6 - The cemeteries are full of dead heroes. Don't add to their number. Run if you can. There is no shame in avoiding a fight. In fact, running away is smart.

7 - Recognize objects in every room of your home that could be used as makeshift weapons. Home invasion is a growing curse these days due to the unwillingness of our governments to protect their citizens.

8 - THIS IS MORE OF A LEGAL WARNING: Understand that if you allow yourself to be placed in a "compromising" position with a woman, particularly one who is "under-age," then the woman's version of events will usually be believed over the man's version. Do not allow yourself to get into such situations.

9 - Negotiation is a far higher art form than physical confrontation. Do anything reasonable to avoid a fight. NOTHING good ever comes out of conflict. War is proof of that.

10 - When all else fails, your back is to the wall and there is absolutely no other alternative left remember... "it is better to be tried by twelve than carried by six."

Remember my opening words - "increasing personal safety ALWAYS commences with awareness." Increase your awareness, mind your manners, know your surroundings and you will certainly improve your safety.



Saturday, June 17, 2017

Introduction To HAPKIDO

Hapkido practitioner becomes well-versed in many kicks, punches, and blocks. From Aiki-Jujitsu (the predecessor of Aikido) it gets most of its grappling techniques. Hence, the Hapkido practitioner spends an equated volume of time learning techniques such as throws and joint locks. The advantage of studying Hapkido versus studying one striking style and one grappling style is that the practitioner learns to use the two approaches to flatter one another. For example, a Hapkido artist would use a punch to disrupt her training partner while a challenging throw is set up. 

Hapkido students practice throws and joint man...
Hapkido students practice throws and joint manipulation in a dojang.
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

Conversely, a Hapkido performer can turn around or off-balance his opponent to decrease their knack to defend against a kick. Along these same lines, the Hapkido performer learns to counter in the opposite manner of an strike, hence mystifying the foe. As such, linear attacks are countered with a roundish technique and spherical attacks are countered with a linear technique. Hapkido artists furthermore become skilled at vital targets and pressure points in order to immobilise their attacker as fast as imaginable.

Hapkido - Very similar to traditional Hapkido, this contemporary version uses Muay Thai striking techniques as a replacement of getting its strikes.

Hapkido is a brand of self-defense that employs joint locks, pressure points, throws, kicks, and other strikes. Hapkido practitioners learn to counter the techniques of other martial arts as well as common "unskilled" attacks. There is also a range of traditional weapons including short stick, cane, rope, sword and staff which adjust in emphasis depending on the particular tradition examined.

Albeit hapkido consist of both long and close range fighting techniques, the objective of most engagements is to get near for a close punch, lock, or throw. Hapkido emphasizes spherical motion, non-resisting movements, and ownership of the adversary. Practitioners seek to get advantage by the use of footwork and body positioning to employ leverage, avoiding the use of strength against strength.

On the "hard-soft" scale of martial arts, hapkido stands everyplace in the center, employing "soft" techniques similar to jujitsu and aikido as well as "hard" techniques reminiscent of taekwondo and tangsoodo. Even the "hard" techniques, though, emphasize spherical rather than linear movements. Hapkido is an eclectic martial art, and different hapkido schools emphasize varied techniques. Then again, some core techniques are found in each school (kwan), and all techniques should follow the three principles of hapkido:

Right Hapkido tactics include using footwork and a series of kicks and hand strikes to bridge the distance with an foe. Afterward to instantaneously control the balance of the rival (naturally by manipulating the head and neck), for a take down or to isolate a wrist or arm and apply a joint twisting throw, depending upon the situation; Hapkido is a comprehensive system and as the rival's balance has been taken, there are a myriad of techniques to disable and overcome the foe.

Hapkido endeavors to be a absolutely comprehensive fighting style and as such strives to keep away from narrow specialization in any particular variety of technique or range of fighting. It maintains a wide range of tactics for striking, standing jointlocks, throwing techniques (both pure and joint manipulating throws) and pinning techniques. some classes as well incorporate tactics for ground fighting notwithstanding these tactics readily tend to be focused upon escaping, controlling, striking and gouging tactics over submissions and emphasizing the capability to take one's feet and situational awareness over pins.

Like most martial arts, hapkido employs a great number of punches and hand strikes, as well as elbow strikes. A distinctive example of hapkido hand techniques is "live hand" punch that focuses energy to the baek hwa hyul in the hand, causing energy strikes and internal strikes. The hand strikes are readily used to weaken the training partner ahead of joint locking and throwing, and additionally as finishing techniques. Hand striking in hapkido (unless in competition) is not localized to punches and open hand striking; some significance is given to striking with talons at the throat and eyes; pulling at the foe's genitals is also covered in established training. in order to recall hand strikes more easily in an emotionally charged situation, beginning students are taught usual, effective routines of blocks and counterattacks called Makko Chigi, which results to more compound techniques as the student becomes familiar with them.

A good deal of of hapkido's joint control techniques are cited to be derived largely From aikijujutsu. They are taught additionally to aikido techniques, but in general the circles are lesser and the techniques are applied in a more linear fashion. Hapkido's joint manipulation techniques attack both large joints (such as the elbow, shoulder, neck, back, knee, and hip) and small joints (such as wrists, fingers, ankles, toes, jaw)

Wristlocks Hapkido is well accepted for its use of a wide variety of wristlocks. These techniques are believed to have been derived From Daito-ryu aikijujutsu even though their manner of performance is not always alike to that of the parent art. Still many of the tactics found in hapkido are quite similar to those of Daito-ryu and of aikido which was derived From that art. These involve such tactics as the supinating wristlock, pronating wristlock, internal rotational wristlock and the utilizing of pressure points on the wrist and are ordinary to many types of Japanese jujutsu, Chinese qin na and even 'catch as catch can' brawling.



Elbowlocks Even if well recognized for its wristlocking techniques hapkido has an equally wide range of tactics which centre upon the manipulation of the elbow joint (see armlocks). The first self defense technique typically taught in many hapkido schools is the knifehand elbow press. This technique is thought to be derived From Daito-ryu's ippondori, a development of disarming and destroying the elbow joint of a sword wielding foe. Hapkido classically introduces this technique off a wrist grabbing strike where the defender makes a roundish movement with his hands to free themselves From their foe's grasp and applies a pronating wristlock while cutting down upon the elbow joint with their forearm, taking their rival down to the ground where an elbow lock is administered with one's hand or knee to immobolize the attacker in a pin. Interestingly both Daito-ryu and aikido opt for to use handpressure on the elbow during the technique rather than using the forearm as a 'hand blade', cutting the into elbow joint, in the hapkido manner.

Hapkido training can be realized in any city in the world and I encourage you to visit out martial arts directory of Hapkido to find a school near you!




Friday, June 9, 2017

Benefits of YOGA - New Mixed MARTIAL ARTS Training Program Wins

Many "Mixed Martial Arts" (MMA) fighters have the strength and endurance to be formidable opponents, but they struggle with breathing, balance, and flexibility. An excellent training method to solve this problem is yoga. Yoga is not just for a bunch of new age peace lovers it is a proven discipline for anyone with a desire to strengthen the body and mind.

Many MMA facilities across the country have started to incorporate yoga into their training programs. The correlation between yoga and grappling techniques used in Brazilian Jujitsu are remarkably similar. The obvious benefits of yoga are increases in balance and flexibility which enhances speed while it decreases the risk of injury.

There are many other beneficial properties of yoga training. One major quality is enhanced dexterity to formulate submissions in a more fluid and coordinated matter. Through yoga, a fighter can amplify balance and core strength in stabilizer muscles often ignored in standard "Mixed Martial Arts" training programs.

Balance improvement will greatly decrease the chances of slipping. How often have you seen a fight end in minutes due to an unfortunate slip? A perfect example of this is the Kimbo Slice vs. Seth Petruzelli fight. Kimbo's lack of balance gave the fight advantage to his opponent he then lost the fight in eleven seconds.

Another important factor in "Mixed Martial Arts" is breathing control. You can easily observe the best fighters have mastered proper breathing. This enables them to outlast opponents and even persevere through a near submission.

Yoga added to a weekly workout routine provides a change rotation for muscles normally used in strength and condition training. This will rejuvenate any muscles used primarily during the week while still being able to make progress with scheduled training.

There are at least fifty other direct fighting benefits yoga can offer with unique training routines for any fighter. If you are really serious about winning, use this brand new fight training technique for a new yoga edge in the ring.

    Satori is a Certified Hatha Yoga Instructor, Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher,and personal life coach.

    Article Directory: EzineArticles

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

What to do if someone wants to fight you!

PHYSICAL COMPETANCE

Have you ever seen raw violence or someone getting 'owned'? Just search google for "martial street fights" - "martial owned" Watch those movies and cringe!!!

Kung Fu, Boxing, dancing, balley, incompetance? What will you display to your attacker if that day comes?

People from the Korean Martial Arts School in ...
People from the Korean Martial Arts School in Calgary, Alberta, Canada do a demonstration.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Can you throw a punch or even stand steady on one leg? can you do a round-house or even give a kick to the knee? Ever heard of a combination, technique or form?

Today we are lazy, probably fat too.. Go look in the mirror and skip for ten minutes, then check your image again and what do you see?

I can judge I am probably half the strength and endurance form 10 years ago, how about you?


MARTIAL KNOWLEDGE

a martial art is defined as - 1 : of, relating to, or suited for war or a warrior 2 : relating to an army or to military life 3 : experienced in or inclined to war : WARLIKE

a martial art is defined as: various styles of self-defense, usually weaponless, based on techniques developed in ancient China, India, and Tibet.

The term 'Kung Fu' does not relate to any specific form of martial art, but rather translates as 'talent' or 'aptitude'.

Wu Shu is traditionally the term popularly used to describe the traditional Chinese martial arts, though other descriptions akin to Kuo-shu, Kuo-chi, Chien-shu and Tao-fa have also been used occasionally. (Wu Shu is the term of late used for Chinese martial arts by the People's Republic of China).

If you’ve never studied a martial art, your awareness of them most likely starts at Bruce Lee movies and ends with the stylized theatrics of The Matrix. If that’s the case, you may not realize from what you’ve gleaned onscreen that there are an estimated 200 unique kinds of martial arts, and within these, thousands of different styles. Karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do are among the most popular and well-known of the martial arts in the U.S., but there are numerous others.

Despite the array of martial arts and styles, most of them share common techniques, and so they can be organized into broad categories that facilitate understanding. The primary way of classifying martial arts is by the basic physical technique they use: striking or grappling.

Because karate, judo, kung fu, and tae kwon do have been more prominent than other forms in popular culture, from film to sporting events, many people mistakenly believe that all martial arts are Asian in origin. In fact, diverse cultures throughout history from Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East have also given birth to their own martial art forms.

Or a combination of triangles with small circles as can be seen in chinese trapping, wrist locks or Aikido entry and endings.

Do you even know the diffference between kung fu and karate? Do you think wing chun is a chinese dish?

The different styles can even be related to shapes or geometry - squares, triangles and circles.


MARTIAL TRAINING TO LIVE

Training is hard..really hard. The most hard is to get started and its down-hill easy from there. What you need is a martial arts machine - something new and exciting to get you off your fat ass.

Everyone knows someone who knows how to fight - with fists, knives, weapons, guns, tactical, sensless, whatever but START!

Or find a martial arts school in your area.

GO to the local phone book and look up kung fu or karate. Then give them a call, go along or take your kid.

Whats important now is to do something, start with brief excercise, get into stretching, shadow box, then step up and train hard.


ITS DANGEROUS OUT THERE

Its dangerous out there and especially for you..

The enemy may be next door and you dont know it but you got to have the guts too look. What can you really do once you see some violence or get scared or worse because you receive a bashing or king hit - do you hide in your house?

TV today scares the shiit out of many people as it promotes violence and turns the meek yellow and nervous. 

The danger today is maybe not too obvious to you but you better hone your sensors or youll get hit without seeing it coming. 

You know that given a situation to be a hero and stop a crime, terrorism or violence you'll be able to step up or chase after them etc - or maybe you'll cower or be the victim. 

Were are you on the scared meter of life? Are you out there amongst it or a bit of a shy body or house mummys boy? 




CONCLUSION IS ACTION

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you petrified.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

Life is not scarey but maybe your lack of skill, self confidence and personal competance is making you afraid.

If you are not liking what you see in the mirror, afraid to go down a dark street, scared of a potential confrontation then train now.

Be pro-active and look, then choose and participate in action whether alone with a martial arts training machine or go to a dojo.

We cant all be Bruce Lee but you also dont want to be an emotional and physical punching bag do you?


THE TRAINING ANSWER

The Martialarm is the only martial arts training dummy that bequeaths you consummate realism in all your martial arts training in kung fu, karate, krav maga, jeet kune do, tae kwon do, kempo and more.

The martialarm is unlike similar training dummies: The wooden dummy has been used for centuries as a solo training machine. In contemporary years, they've been provided accessible in different materials as well as synthetic. But still they all have one item in general:

They dont swing and they're all static.

The wooden dummy frequently costs hundreds of dollars but is still only produced to absorb your blows and step up your precision moves. It doesn't react to your attacks akin to a factual partner can. So although you get apt repetition training, which is acceptable for accomplishing the basics down, it may well be difficult to use and will get dreary so quickly.

Why A little Martial Artists Improve Faster Than Others

As martial artists, we all recognize this. Your martial arts instructor probably hammers the point home in practice every day. Alas, there are only so so many classes in a week and this can stunt your learning and headway.

You want to improve - swift. And you're keen put in your time with home training. But solo training can only take you so far due to the fact it lacks the interaction that only a assistant can award.

Until Now!